Apple isn’t playing around when it comes to customer security.

According to Clare Lane, contributor to PRDaily.com, Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, is eager to protect his customer’s privacy after he publically rejected the FBI’s request for the technology company to create new hacking software. Software designed to bypass the security of an iPhone that had belonged to one of the San Bernadino attackers. Considering the recent issues in hacking, Cook believes the software would do more harm than good, especially in the wrong hands. This is a big no for Apple and a reason as to why the company is eager to set up a legal battle against the FBI to protect its customers.

Tim Cook, after Macworld Expo 2009 keynote
Image by Valery Marchive via Flickr.com

Refusing to comply with the FBI is no small matter. Apple’s decision will likely severely impact the business in one of two ways. Consumers may find Cook’s decision to me anti-American or in support of terrorism. This would negatively affect sales of Apple products
decreasing the company’s value and stock price. On the other hand, consumers might appreciate Cook’s commitment to protecting customer privacy resulting in an increase in sales and rise in share prices.

The issue we are facing with technology and privacy is that the two have doomed us by combining together. People now carry their most sensitive information stored on their phones: passwords, contact info, electronic bank cards and more. Advances in technology make it easier for programmers to develop software capable of bypassing the passcodes and fingerprint scans on iPhones. To counter attackers Apple has created its “bug bounty program,” paying select hackers up to $20,000 to find weaknesses in Apple’s security software. This allows Apple to solve problems before they become serious issues created by dangerous hackers. The only issue is the black market pays considerably more money for unsolvable hacks than Apple.

I appreciate Cook’s commitment to his customers and believe his actions are honorable. However, I believe Apple and the FBI need to sit down and create a solution that allows the FBI to obtain the information needed from the phone without putting millions at risk.

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